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Your son called my son a nigger… I don’t like it!

20 Feb

It was the start of the skiing week… kids were enrolled in the ski school and all was well.

In the Red Princes group of 11 boys and 1 girl there was a little guy, eight years old… a tiny little thing cute as can be.
At the end of the afternoon, I heard from my son that he had been called “a nigger” on several occasions by this blond angel.

I read Mr. Obama’s early life records in his autobiographical book, and as I sat and listened to my son telling me how he was tired of the “white people” treating him badly because of his skin color, I could not but empathize with his situation. I heard him telling me that he was as white as he was black, but no one could see that. I listened to him tell me that he could listen to white people insulting him ten times, but the eleventh time, he would give a punch in someone’s face, because it was too much.

I tried to calm him down and explain that there was such a thing as ignoring someone’s bad words and walking away. My peaceful words fell into a closed ear.

So, the next day, I decided to brave the parents who gave life to the boy with the foul mouth. When I saw that a man accompanied the boy, I assumed he was the father and approached him. After checking that I was facing the right “opponent”, I stated my point:

“Your son called mine a “nigger” and I would like you to have a word with him”
The man immediately replied that he had heard of that and talked to his son.

“I don’t like it” I added.
The man said “I understand, and I apologise for this.”

At the end of the day, I inquired to find out how the day went and if there had been any more insults. My son said that the other boy stayed away from him all day.

Since I had voiced my disagreement when the boy was nasty to my son, I decided that I should let the father (and the boy) know that I appreciated the silence he had chosen towards my son. I bought a lollipop and presented it to the father the next day, saying that the boys had found a way to be peaceful and I appreciated it.

The father was stunned and said “This is such a nice gesture, I did not expect this. Thank you.”

Come to think of it, it is so much easier to throw punches… or nasty words. It is much harder to use “sorry” and “thank you” and smile, while stating one’s point of view in a matter as horrible as racism and hatred being spoken through young children towards others.
I tried to explain to my son that it is different if people insult him for something he did wrong, but it is unacceptable to be insulted for what he is, because he cannot change this, and he did not choose it.

Oh, growing up… growing older… what a dilemma.

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Posted by on February 20, 2012 in Opinions

 

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